DRAFT

STATE OF HAWAII
BOARD OF EDUCATION
STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT COMMITTEE AND
FINANCE AND INFRASTRUCTURE COMMITTEE JOINT MEETING

MINUTES

Queen Liliuokalani Building
1390 Miller Street, Room 404
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
Thursday, April 21, 2022
*This meeting was a remote meeting under Section 92-3.7, Hawaii Revised Statutes.

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT COMMITTEE MEMBERS PRESENT:
Kili Namauʻu, Chairperson
Bill Arakaki, Vice Chairperson
Shanty Asher
Lyla Berg
Lynn Fallin
Catherine Payne
Kenneth Uemura

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT COMMITTEE MEMBERS EXCUSED:
Kaimana Barcarse

FINANCE AND INFRASTRUCTURE COMMITTEE MEMBERS PRESENT:
Bruce Voss, Chairperson
Lynn Fallin, Vice Chairperson
Bill Arakaki
Kili Namauʻu
Catherine Payne

FINANCE AND INFRASTRUCTURE COMMITTEE MEMBERS EXCUSED:
None

ALSO PRESENT:
Kyla Musso, Student Representative
Keith Hayashi, Interim Superintendent, Department of Education
Sean Tajima, Complex Area Superintendent, Campbell-Kapolei Complex Area, Department of Education
Linell Dilwith, Complex Area Superintendent, Kaimuki-McKinley-Roosevelt Complex Area, Department of Education
Brian Hallett, Assistant Superintendent, Office of Fiscal Services, Department of Education
Esther Kanehailua, Complex Area Superintendent, Hilo-Waiakea Complex Area, Department of Education
Alison Kunishige, Executive Director
Kenyon Tam, Board Analyst
Lady Garrett, Secretary


I. Call to Order

Student Achievement Committee Chairperson Kili Namauʻu called the joint meeting of the Student Achievement Committee (“SAC”) and Finance and Infrastructure Committee (“FIC”) meeting to order at 11:21 a.m.


II. Public Testimony on Board of Education (“Board”) Agenda Items

SAC Chairperson Namauʻu called for public testimony on this agenda item.

Cheri Nakamura, HEʻE Coalition, testified on agenda item III.A. update on the educational plan and fiscal plan to use federal funds in the second round of the Educational Stabilization Fund’s Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (“ESSER II”) and in the third round of ESSER funds authorized under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (“ESSER ARP”). She stated that she would like to stand on written testimony, noted that the information the Department of Education (“Department”) provided does not help the public or Board understand of how the ESSER funds spent affect student needs, and suggested that the Department create a process to monitor and track this data.

Susan Pcola-Davis, member of the public, testified on agenda item III.A. Update on the educational plan and fiscal plan to use federal funds in the second round of the Educational Stabilization Fund’s ESSER II and ESSER ARP. She asked if the Department is able to gather data for students in quarantine versus isolation and requested more information on the implemented strategies for students.

Jessica Hoecker, member of the public, testified on agenda item III.A. Update on the educational plan and fiscal plan to use federal funds in the second round of the Educational Stabilization Fund’s ESSER II and ESSER ARP. She stated that ESSER funding is related to learning loss, which is an issue in all schools and asked if anyone is looking at how masks are affecting kids.

Cheri Nakamura, HEʻE Coalition, testified on agenda item IV.A., Action on amendment to the Department’s fiscal plan to use federal funds in ESSER II and ESSER ARP approved by the Board on December 16, 2021 (“Amendment to fiscal plan”). She stated that she would like to stand on her written testimony and asked that the Committee consider deferring action because the Department has provided insufficient information.

Susan Pcola-Davis, member of the public, testified on agenda item IV.A. Amendment to fiscal plan. She testified that she agreed with the transfer of the funds to avoid losing federal funding, but noted that the recommendation did not provide information about how the Department will use the money, and suggested the Committee defer action on the agenda item until the Board selects a permanent superintendent who can determine how to spend the funds.

Jessica Hoecker, member of the public, testified on agenda item IV.A. Amendment to fiscal plan. She stated that there is a lack of transparency on how the Department is allocating funding to schools and that principals cannot talk about how they are using funds.


III. Discussion Items

SAC Chairperson Namauʻu called on Keith Hayashi, Interim Superintendent, Department of Education (“Department”), to present the Department’s educational plan and fiscal plan to use ESSER II and ESSER ARP funds (collectively, “ESSER funds”) as approved by the Board on December 16, 2021.

Hayashi outlined the Department’s update on the implementation of the Department’s educational and fiscal plans to use ESSER funds. He stated that the Department continues to address student needs, learning loss, and facilitate student and staff success. Hayashi stated that the Department is committed to healthy habits and healthy schools. He explained that the Department is action oriented and uses data informed decision-making to make instructional and operational decisions for students and schools.

Hayashi stated that the Department has expended 14.1% of ESSER funds to support the four priority strategies: (1) Healthy Habits, Healthy Schools; (2) Action-Oriented Data Decision-Making; (3) Responsive Capacity Building; and (4) Effective Academic Practices, which are contingent on the restoration of state funding. He emphasized that the Department anticipates that the Legislature will restore funding to the Department for the 2022-2023 Fiscal Year. He explained that the Department will continue to monitor student attendance to engage students for in-person learning.

Hayashi stated that from fall to winter, schools supported students to strengthen their growth mindset. He also explained that Attachment C provides an update of health and safety support including a total of 107 school health support staff; expansion of state distance learning in both English and Kaiapuni with the procurement of new learning management system; statewide implementation of a social emotional assessment; increased mental health services; COVID-19 pandemic impact services; a more robust summer program; professional development; ESSER funded community activities; and shifting use of funds from health and safety to address learning loss.

Hayashi announced that Sean Tajima, Complex Area Superintendent (“CAS”), Campbell-Kapolei, Esther Kanehailua, CAS, Hilo-Waiakea Complex Area, and Linell Dilwith, CAS, Kaimuki-McKinley-Roosevelt would each share what is happening in their respective complex areas.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin expressed concern that based on the amount of information the Department provided regarding the impact of ESSER funds, it was hard to understand the Department’s decision-making process. She noted that Hayashi previously presented his 3-1-1 priorities (health and safety, social-emotional learning, and accelerated learning) but now he is presenting on four system-wide strategies, which appear to be a shift from the original approach.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin asked for clarification of the Department’s process and thought process relating to chronic absenteeism. She stated that the Department makes broad statements on page 2 “absences may be attributed to the need for quarantine” and that “the DOE continues to monitor and provide necessary student and family support.” She expressed support for the Department’s role in deciding what actions to take, but noted that the Board and Department share the responsibility of impact.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin stated that the system in place does not help the Board understand impact because the metrics the Department has selected show little movement. She stated that the Department provided information about actions, but in order to demonstrate impact, the Department needs to shift the presentation to show the impact and targets, including whether the Department has progressed or not. SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin stated that the Department needs to show the Board how these funds are affecting students; at this time, the Board does not know the impact because the Department is not providing it with metrics.

Hayashi replied that his 3-1-1 strategy was to refocus schools on academics, accelerated learning, and social emotional learning so they could identify areas for support. He explained that the Department’s ESSER educational plan identifies four strategies: (1) healthy habits, healthy schools; (2) action-oriented data decision-making; (3) responsive capacity building; and, (4) effective academic practices.

Tajima stated that the CAS developed the complex area plans during the increase in COVID-19 cases and that at that time the priority was safety in schools. He emphasized that academics has always been at the forefront, but getting students in school is important so that schools can support students in other areas. Tajima stated that this year, the Campbell-Kapolei complex area purchased counselors, health aides, security officers, and English language learner education aides to support students. He explained that the complex area used data to drive decisions and that the complex area will measure impact by survey results. Tajima also stated that some schools who did not apply for ESSER funds previously would be will applying for ESSER funding in the second semester of the school year.

Dilwith stated that the Board approved ESSER funding at the end of the second quarter and schools received funding during the third quarter of the school year. She stated that every school used fall data to identify supports and resources and that each school principal created a proposal tied to school data. Dilwith shared that the complex areas will be able to share more about the impacts during the next school year.

FIC Chairperson Bruce Voss asked about the types of programs complex areas are proposing for the most disadvantaged students.

Dilwith replied that ESSER funded programs aim to increase student engagement in order to increase student attendance. She detailed an example of how the Kaimuki-McKinley-Roosevelt complex area focused on its English Learner student population. Dilwith stated that the McKinley-Roosevelt complex area includes 23% of the state’s English Learner enrollment, so schools created bilingual/bicultural school-home assistant positions and hired community members who spoke the same language as the students. She stated that the McKinley-Roosevelt complex area also adopted a framework for how students complete their assignments in the classroom.

Tajima stated that the Campbell-Kapolei complex area would use ESSER funds to increase student services for the next school year. He said that schools have already begun efforts to connect students with their schools and highlighted that Ewa Makai Middle School had the highest level of parent input on student programs like enrichment and remediation.

FIC Chairperson Voss expressed support for the schools’ innovative use of ESSER funds and expressed his hope that the Department can create a marketplace of ideas where schools can publish what they are doing and share what has worked (or not), so other schools can use this information and customize it according to their needs.

Hayashi replied that the Department is looking to provide opportunities for principals to share and collaborate because what works in one school community may not work in another school community. He also shared that during elementary and secondary education principal forums, principals share how their respective schools are engaging students. Hayashi shared his experience with fourth grade students learning about plants and various health benefits. FIC Chairperson Voss encouraged the Department to provide metrics relating to these individual programs to the CASs, principals, and public so that people can see the overall impact of these programs.

SAC Vice Chairperson and FIC Member Arakaki echoed comments from FIC Chairperson Voss and asked the Department to provide information relating to formative data and information on how students are doing. SAC Vice Chairperson and FIC Member Arakaki explained that CAS used a complex area needs assessment to review what schools are using and included an improvement plan.

SAC Vice Chairperson and FIC Member Arakaki expressed appreciation for the Nā Hopena Aʻo (HĀ) training and noted that it is important that students feel connected to their school with a sense of belonging. He stated that there are many components involved and if continued will provide a great future for all students.

SAC and FIC Member Asher stated that during a school visit to Campbell High School, she was able to understand the learning environment and how the schools are working to address the learning gaps to ensure that students are not left behind. She noted that the school’s culinary program was state of the art and that she would like to see this replicated in other schools. SAC and FIC Member Asher also shared about her experience during a school visit to Kaimuki High School who held a student cultural performance, which can be used to build on student skills. SAC and FIC Member Asher shared that at some of the middle schools she visited, schools used after school sports activities build on the strengths of students.

SAC and FIC Member Asher emphasized the comments shared earlier during the Student Achievement Committee by Board Student Representative Musso about finding purpose is really important because some of these students do not have role models. She requested the CASs consider family home visits to explain options for students to families.

SAC Chairperson Namauʻu expressed appreciation for the CASs and she emphasized that everyone is working hard to help our students. She suggested that schools who are struggling to understanding what is happening with their students present to the Board. Hayashi replied that even at successful schools, some students are struggling and that all schools are doing everything that can be done to help students. He stated that the Department can share generally about the struggles happening across schools and he committed to having more CASs and principals share what is happening in their school communities.

SAC Member Berg left the meeting at 12:30 p.m.

SAC Chairperson Namauʻu announced that Committee Member Berg needed to leave and would not be participating in the remainder of the meeting.


IV. Recommendation for Action

SAC Chairperson Namauʻu called on Hayashi and Brian Hallett, Assistant Superintendent, Office of Fiscal Services, to present the Department’s recommendation for an amendment to the Department’s fiscal plan to use ESSER II and ESSER ARP funds as approved by the Board on December 16, 2021.

Hayashi stated that the Department is seeking the Board’s approval to realign the distribution of $53 million allocated to the complex areas, based on the revisions from the 15 complex areas summarized in Attachment B of his memorandum. He stated that the Department based its distribution of funds on five designated programs that the complex areas developed in September 2021, but as COVID-19, pandemic conditions changed the complex areas needed to change their spending plans.

Hayashi explained that the proposed changes represent the net changes requested by all of the complex areas to shift funds to focus on academic needs accelerated learning for all students. He explained that the Department is seeking approval to align its spending plan between ESSER I, ESSER II, and ESSER ARP funds to program the use of all available funds.

Hayashi stated that the Department would like to ensure that ESSER I funds are fully expended before the September 30, 2022 deadline. He explained that the Department is seeking to reduce the current expenditure plan by $4.76 million and to ensure that the $5.25 million from ESSER II funds allocated are repurposed so that the $10.1 million of ESSER I and II funds that is now available to address a portion of the $23.4 million programmed to offset a portion of the legislature’s $100.2 million reduction.

Hayashi explained that the ESSER ARP funds that are no longer required to meet the weighted student formula shortfalls. He stated that the Department would like to redirect $10.1 million and $1.23 million from the superintendent’s contingency funds for the following three purposes: (1) funding an additional tool for system-wide strategic support areas; (2) building capacity to support the professional development of employees to adjust to the challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic; and (3) action oriented data decision-making to promote the use of data to identify and adjust to the needs of students and staff. He explained that the Department’s request would enable it to fund the system-wide strategic support initiatives outlined in the educational plan with temporary additional funds and allow the Department to avoid relying on repurposing.

Hayashi stated that the Department would allocate more funds to math professional development because students are showing a significant decrease in math proficiency since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. He also stated that the Department would use $400,000 to increase summer 2022 funding, which the Department would use to cover the increased part-time temporary teacher (“PTT”) pay rates. Hayashi stated that the Board approved the increase of the pay rates on December 16, 2021 and that following the repeal of Chapter 8-66, Hawaii Administrative Rules, the pay rates will increase from $22.43 to $42.16, which is an additional $19.73 per hour.

Hayashi expressed appreciation to the Board and noted that in the context of the $639.5 million in ESSER funds, the increase in cost for PTTs is a relatively minimal amount and noted that the Department anticipates the restoration of general fund budget cuts that will be allocated for the next fiscal year. He explained that another $53 million will be included for complex areas and the Department will provide a future report on the distribution of these funds and any revisions necessary in July.

SAC Chairperson Namauʻu noted that SAC and FIC will each need to make and vote on motions separately and only committee members can move, second, and vote on the motions for their respective committees.

SAC Vice Chairperson Arakaki moved to approve the amendments to the Department’s fiscal plan for the use of ESSER II and ESSER ARP funds, as described in Hayashi’s memorandum dated April 21, 2022. SAC Member Asher seconded.

FIC Member Payne moved to approve the amendments to the Department’s fiscal plan for the use of ESSER II and ESSER ARP funds, as described in Hayashi’s memorandum dated April 21, 2022. FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin seconded.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin asked for clarification on the reasons the Department is asking to amend its fiscal plan. She asked whether the amendment is due to: (1) conditions changing so the Department is shifting to align with four priority strategy areas within Hayashi’s 3-1-1 priorities; (2) an attempt to avoid federal funding lapses; and (3) the infusion of general funds from the state.

Hallett confirmed that SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin is correct regarding the first two reasons and that the Department is confident that the Legislature will restore general funds to its budget. He explained that the Department is asking to repurpose funds by shifting expenditures from ESSER III and ESSER II to fund two system-wide strategies additional math professional development and additional PPT costs for summer school. Hallett stated that the Department detailed these items in its December 16, 2021 education plan so the Department is asking to amend its fiscal plan to change the means of finance or increase the amounts previously approved by the Board.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin asked for an explanation of the Department’s large shifts in funding. Hallett replied that the shifts would focus on learning loss because the complex areas developed plans several months ago and that the shifts will prioritize more resources for academics.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin asked what will happen if the Board defers action. Hallett replied that resources would not be aligned with need and that the Department is anxious due to spending challenges with carryover monies. He stated that the longer the Department waits, the more spending for the current fiscal year would be delayed. Hallett stated that the Department would provide updates periodically and maintain continuous conversations given the Board’s desire to be involved.

Hayashi stated that the Board’s approval would support the Department’s efforts to provide math professional development, PTT pay rate adjustments, and complex area plans adjustments.

Tajima shared that the complex areas requested amendments in January 2022 and that at that time, the Department was dealing with a high volume of COVID-19 cases in schools. He stated that because of this, the Campbell-Kapolei complex area decided to put more resources into a complex area distance-learning program for the next school year. Tajima stated that his complex area requested amendments, which included an increase in distance learning positions from three to six for a total of $400,000. Tajima explained that no qualified individuals applied for the positions, so the complex area is looking to re-allocate these monies to give the schools what they originally requested.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin stated that she understood the administrative challenges, but was still concerned about the impact of the funds.

FIC Chairperson Voss stated that the first piece is taking ESSER funds not expended for the originally funded purposes for various reasons and repurposing those funds to make sure federal funds will not expire. He noted that this is good financial sense because it will free up more than $11 million that the Department and Board can reallocate.

FIC Chairperson Voss expressed support for the $600,000 for math professional development and $400,000 to increase funding for 2022 summer learning. He noted that the Department needs to provide more information about funding 16 positions (one position per complex area and the statewide coordinator to administer the ESSER funds) because the numbers that the Department provided do not add up to $10 million for responsive capacity building, and action oriented data decision-making. FIC Chairperson Voss asked the Department to provide additional information relating to the balance of the responsive capacity building and action oriented data decision-making funds, what specifically the funds be used for and who will determine when the funds will be expended.

Hayashi replied that responsive capacity building and action oriented data decision-making is for two years of funding using the remaining ESSER ARP funds, which is part of the overall strategy. He also explained that responsive capacity building and effective academic practices make up the four pillars of system wide strategies that all complex areas will focus on to build consistency across schools. Hayashi stated that one of his 3-1-1 priorities was focused on staff support, so the Department looked at how to build a system to honor leadership and further discussions on accountability so that data aligns across all systems.

FIC Chairperson Voss stated that this does not explain what all of the funds will be used for and there is still a lack of specificity because the coordinator position identified in the memorandum, even if for a period of over two years, will not be more than $3 million of the $10 million so the Department needs to explain what it will use the remainder of $7 million for. He asked whether the Department is planning to use these funds for initiatives, temporary staff, programs, professional development, activities, or support materials.

Hayashi replied that Hallett would provide further information relating to the proposed costs.

Hallett referenced rows 13, 15, and 16 of Attachment, A which outlined the Board’s previous approvals of the system wide strategies costing $5.12 million with the intention that costs would be incurred in FY 2022-2023 and FY 2023-2024. He stated that the Department provided the Board with details in December 2021 for one staff position per complex area and one state level position including the associated fringe benefit amounts. Hallett noted that the amount seems high being that the fringe amount is 62%, so the amount was determined based off the 16 positions and fringe costs.

FIC Chairperson Voss stated that there is still a large amount of money that will be leftover and that he would like to know the amounts that the Department is planning to spend on responsive capacity building and action oriented data decision-making. Hallett stated that it is $5 million per bucket and will total $2.5 million per year per strategy. FIC Chairperson Voss stated that he is still unsure that the Board has enough information on what the Department will use the $10 million for.

SAC Member Uemura stated that the Department is making many general comments and is not providing specific information, so it is hard for Board members to get comfortable with the Department’s proposed changes. He asked that the Department provide more detail on how the changes will affect students. SAC Member Uemura stated that regarding the WSF, he would like to know why the Department is taking away funds from this. He stated that when the Department allocates large amounts, it needs to be a plan on how to expend the funds. He expressed concern with approving the changes until the Department provides more information.

Hayashi replied that the educational plan approved by the Board on December 16, 2021 outlined action-oriented data decision-making and will focus on instructional teams to facilitate student academic progress and responsive capacity building related to professional development in support and coaching as further outlined in his memorandum.

SAC Vice Chairperson and FIC Member Arakaki urged the Board to listen to the CASs who described the process that they went through to collaborate and work with principals regarding the needs of each school and understanding the anxiety CASs experience when trying to fill positions so that the Board can get impact data. He stated that filling these positions is going to be a key step to support students. He urged the Board to listen to the CASs regarding this matter.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin stated that she has concerns about impact and useful information for all stakeholders. She stated that the Board approved the Department’s educational and fiscal plans in December 2021, but that this the discussion triggered a lot more questions on how the Department is implementing its plans and what is different and new. SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin requested more information and stated that she understood capacity building, but that she is struggling with how the funds will be used for action-oriented data decision-making.

Hayashi stated that the positions for action oriented decision-making and responsive capacity building will support the complex areas in the upcoming 2022-2023 school year. He explained that the positions currently do not exist and during the statewide training all of the strategy personnel will review and set up systems cohesively across the system to share within complex areas.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin asked if there is a document that describes the system Hayashi described because she is still unclear. She noted that during previous Department presentations, it provided little to no details regarding the role of the complex areas in relation to the schools and that she would like to understand what the committee is being asked to approve. SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin stated that the committee must understand impact because it is foundational and very important.

Hayashi referred to page 12 of the Department’s ESSER education plan, which provided information on the system wide strategies and detailed the responsibilities of complex areas. He noted that funding the four strategies would bring cohesion to the system to allow schools to encourage students to innovate based on their school communities and the demographics of each complex.

FIC Chairperson Voss stated that he is inclined to support the request due to the importance of repositioning the funds, but that the Department has provided insufficient information on how it will spend the repositioned funds and the impact of repositioning funds. He asked that when the Department provides the additional information requested that it come back with details, which include an impact analysis for responsive capacity building and action oriented data decision-making as requested by SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin.

Hayashi replied that the Department will implement the positions for school 2022-2023 and the Department will provide preliminary details on the impacts in December or January after the positions have a semester to support the system.

FIC Chairperson Voss asked that the information show what the positions are doing and how the positions are contributing to the overall objectives of making data based decisions accurate, complete and full. Hayashi replied that by the end of the semester, the Department will have information on the impact of the positions and can share how the positions help to assist schools and complex areas throughout the Department’s tri-level system.

FIC Chairperson Voss stated that he is inclined to support the Department’s request based on the Department’s commitment to provide additional information.

SAC Member Uemura asked for a point of order because the original motion is to approve the use of funds but he would like to offer an amendment to the motion. He suggested that the Board approve the first two and defer the last item until the Department provides additional information.

FIC Chairperson Voss stated that more information needs to be provided but he does not want to interfere with hiring and would like to know if it is possible for the Department to come back in June or May or if the Department needs the money now.

Dilwith stated that from the complex area standpoint it would be hard to do the work needed if the Board delays approving the funds because it will hamper efforts to hire for these positions to support schools efforts in implementing the four statewide strategies.

Kanehailua encouraged the Board to approve the funding so the complex areas can continue its work because funding is critical to provide opportunities to share effective practices across the state and impact vulnerable populations.

Tajima echoed comments from Dilwith and Kanehailua and stated that there is an urgency for the funding to be approved so the positions can begin the work.

Hayashi noted that it is imperative to have the positions funded and the plan is to have a system in place to articulate important areas to help schools move forward.

FIC Chairperson Voss stated that there are competing considerations because the Department needs the positions, but it is equally important that the Board not approve funding when the Department provides insufficient information.

SAC Member Uemura stated that there is leeway since no action is scheduled to be taken at the general business meeting today, therefore the Board can approve the original motion and request the additional information for the May 5 meeting; the Department has not still provided sufficient information, then the Board can defer decision-making.

FIC Chairperson Voss stated that is an excellent suggestion.

SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin cautioned the Department that the positions would be federally funded and temporary. She also stated that regarding the four statewide strategies, the positions are described and their role will be key to maximizing impact, she is interested in seeing how the positions will fit into the overall system. SAC Member and FIC Vice Chairperson Fallin noted that if the positions are foundational, then they should be generally funded and she expressed support for the proposal from other Board members to request that the Department provide additional information for the May 5 meeting.

SAC and FIC Member Asher expressed support for the amendment and asked what needs are going to be addressed so that the Board can better understand its positions. She requested more content in the future presentation on what the positions will entail and if these positions would be partnering with community experts as well.

Hayashi replied that the positions would be dedicated to the four statewide strategy areas and advertised them internally then externally.

SAC Chairperson Namau‘u called for a roll call vote on the motion for SAC. The motion carried unanimously with all SAC members present voting aye (SAC Vice Chairperson Arakaki, SAC Members Asher, Fallin, Payne, and Uemura).

FIC Chairperson Voss called for a roll call vote on the motion for FIC. The motion carried unanimously with all FIC members present voting aye (Committee Vice Chairperson Fallin, Committee Members Arakaki, Namauʻu, and Payne).

JOINT ACTION: Motion to approve the amendments to the Department’s fiscal plan for the use of ESSER II and ESSER ARP funds, as described in Hayashi’s memorandum dated April 21, 2022 (SAC: Arakaki/Asher; FIC: Payne/Fallin). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.


V. Late Public Testimony on Board Agenda Items

SAC Chairperson Namauʻu called for public testimony from any individuals who did not have an opportunity to testify on earlier agenda items. No one provided oral testimony at this time.

SAC and FIC members received written testimony before the meeting. The following is a listing of the people who submitted written testimony before the meeting.

Name
Organization
Agenda Item
Paddy KauhaneBoys & Girls Club of Hawaii, President & CEOIII.A. Update on Department of Education’s educational plan and fiscal plan to use federal funds in the second round of the ESSER II and in the third round of ESSER ARP approved by the Board on December 16, 2021
Cheri NakamuraHE’E Coalition, Director III.A. Update on Department of Education’s educational plan and fiscal plan to use federal funds in the second round of the ESSER II and in the third round of ESSER ARP approved by the Board on December 16, 2021; and IV.A. Committee Action on Amendment to Department of Education’s Fiscal Plan to Use Federal Funds in ESSER II and ESSER ARP Approved by the Board on December 16, 2021
Paula AdamsHawaii Afterschool Alliance, Executive DirectorIII.A. Update on Department of Education’s educational plan and fiscal plan to use federal funds in the second round of the ESSER II and in the third round of ESSER ARP approved by the Board on December 16, 2021
David MiyashiroHawaiiKidsCAN, Executive DirectorIII.A. Update on Department of Education’s educational plan and fiscal plan to use federal funds in the second round of the ESSER II and in the third round of ESSER ARP approved by the Board on December 16, 2021; and IV.A. Committee Action on Amendment to Department of Education’s Fiscal Plan to Use Federal Funds in ESSER II and ESSER ARP Approved by the Board on December 16, 2021
Suzanne Goodrich

VI. Adjournment

SAC Chairperson Namauʻu adjourned the meeting at 1:43 p.m.